Drapery Pleating Styles

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A pleat is a small section of fabric at the panel heading that has been folded and sewn in place to create fullness.
Our unique pleated styles will give you the custom drapery look to fit your decor.
Avoid the pared down and plain look of ready-made (bought off-the-shelf) pleated draperies.

  • Pleats create uniform proportion and spacing at the panel heading
  • Pleats allow the smooth operation of the drapery panel while opening and closing on hardware
  • Pleats create a smaller, cleaner stack back then other types of headings.
  • Pleats provide uniformly spaced draping.
  • Fullness of the panel can be manipulated by adjusting the size of the pleats, the spacing between pleats, and the number of folds in each pleat.
  • When using fabrics with large patters or repeats, take into consideration how the pattern will be affected by the pleat.

Double Pinch Pleat

Euro Pleat

Four-Finger Pinch Pleat

Goblet Pleat

 

Five-Finger Pinch Pleat

Fan Pleat

Butterfly Pleat

Double Track Pleat

 

Bell Pleat

Swagged Fan Pleat

Cartridge Pleat

Knife Pleat

 

Inverted Box Pleat

Top-Tacked French Pleat

Box Pleat

Pencil Pleat

 

Box Pleat Heading with Shirred Panel

Accordion Pleat

Single Diamond Smocked Pleat

Ruched Cuff

 

Triple Diamond Smocked Pleat

Wired Flounce

Shirred Cuff

Raised Track Pleat

 

Cupped Pleat

Heading: Formal Stiffened
Fullness: 2.5-3.0

Formal Heading

Traditional heading stiffened with buckram or crinoline.

Informal Heading

No buckram or stiffener is used in the heading.

Tack Pleated Heading

The heading between pleats is tack pleated down, creating a set of horizontal pleats.

 

Scalloped Heading

The sections of the heading between pleats are cut in a scalloped shape.

Raised Double Heading

A border heading is placed behind the main panel heading and they are pleated together as one piece.

Embellished Heading

Use decorative trim to highlight the pleat point of the heading.

Flagged Heading

Flags are integrated into a soft heading between pleats.

 

 

Necktie Heading

A necktie flounce is attached to the main panel at the pleat and it is pleated together as one piece.

Raised Scalloped Double Heading

A stright border heading is placed behind the main scalloped panel heading. They are pleated together.

Laced Scarf Heading

A fabric scarf is threaded through buttonholes between the pleats.

Closed Goblet Pleat

The pleat section of the panel is extended and tied close at each pleat.

 

Goblet Pleats with Knotted Ties

Contrasting ties are threaded through buttonholes in the panel at the pleat base.

Open-Throat Goblet Pleat

The front of the goblet has a cutout section to expose the lined interior of the goblet.

Ruffled Insert with Goblet Pleats

A ruffle is insert in the panel at the pleat base before pleating.

Tuxedo Goblet Pleat

The front of the goblet is split and folded back to expose the contrast lining of the interior.

 

Tuxedo Box Pleat

The throat of the box pleat is folded back and tacked or pressed in place.

Rosebud Goblet Pleat

The heading has a raised border. The goblet is short and has an open throat. The upper goblet is stuffed.

Inverted Box Pleat With Buttons

Buttons embellish the face of the panel at the pleat.

Tuxedo Pleats with Buttons

Open tuxedo pleats with contrast lining and interlining are trimmed with buttons.

 

Flag-top Box Pleat

The box pleat has an integrated flag in the heading that is folded over the top of the panel.

Flat-top Box Pleat

The box pleat has an integrated scalloped tab in the heading that is folded over the top of the panel

Euro Pleats with Swagged Heading

Pleated swags are place between each pleat at the heading.

Cuffed Cartrige Pleat

The box pleat has an integrated scalloped tab in the heading that is folded over the top of the panel.

 

Ruched Cartridge Pleats

Pleated swags are placed between each pleat at the heading.

Double Cuffed Heading

The heading has a double valance pleated together as one piece.

Double Pleats with Scalloped Heading

Group pleats together for an interesting heading.

Pinch Pleats With Fanned Flags

Tripple-point flags are added to the top of the heading before pleating to create gathered fans.

 

Tripple Pinch—French Pleat

X Pleat

 
 
 

Pleating styles and illustration used with permission from:
The Design Directory of Window Treatments by Jackie Von Tobel
Published by Gibbs Smith